Morningside of Fullerton
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Seeking help for Mom & Dad?

If you're investigating retirement options for your parents or other loved ones, Morningside can help. Just knowing what to look for can make all the difference in finding the right living option.

Consider the advantages that make retirement living at Morningside unique — and incomparably valuable:

  • Financial. Morningside is fiscally sound, with no third-party debt. All construction loans have been paid off. In addition, the entrance fee is highly repayable, for peace of mind. Click here to review our Annual Report and Financials.
  • Health services. Adjacent to the Morningside campus, Park Vista provides quality long-term care.
  • Design. Morningside has been constructed to the latest codes with the finest comfort, taste and ambience in mind.

Schedule a tour with us, and we'll provide you with a complimentary Morningside Comparison Chart, for weighing your retirement options with all the facts. To schedule your visit, contact us.

The best care for your loved ones — and even more.

While no two retirement communities are exactly alike, understanding the types of living options, the levels of care and general terms will give you a good base of knowledge to compare options and help your family make the right choice. Listed below are some common retirement community terms, for a better understanding of today's senior living options. Contact us to receive your complimentary Comparison Chart, and see for yourself the value of retirement living at Morningside.

RESIDENTIAL LIVING
For healthy seniors not requiring assistance with the activities of daily living, there are several options for a maintenance-free lifestyle. The following types of residential living communities are often age-restricted for those 62 or older.

Active Adult Communities are typically centered around a golf course or other attraction, and residents purchase a house or townhouse. Amenities vary, but available services are limited and typically don't include meals, transportation or access to health care.

CCRCs (continuing care retirement communities) often combine (although not all do) senior housing options with comprehensive services and amenities, and a wide range of educational and social activities. Priority access to on-site or nearby health services may also be included, making the CCRC option a flexible, long-term choice for residential living.

Residents typically pay an entrance fee (many use a portion of the proceeds from the sale of their home) and a monthly fee that covers services and amenities, such as meals, housekeeping, maintenance, transportation and more. CCRCs may offer various contract (residency agreement) options. Entrance fees may be nonrefundable or up to 100 percent refundable. Rental options may be available. Some contracts include health care benefits that help offset future health care costs if residents need assisted living, skilled nursing or other care in the future.

ASSISTED LIVING
For assistance with the activities of day-to-day living, such as dressing, bathing and managing medications, assisted living provides as little or as much help as needed.

LONG TERM CARE
Long-term care varies from community to community, but CCRCs have transformed the environment from the nursing homes of previous generations. Today, most CCRCs offer rehabilitation therapies, recovery care and innovative programming for 24-hour nursing care.

MEMORY SUPPORT/ALZHEIMER'S CARE
Memory support, sometimes called memory care or dementia care, is personalized support for individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other types of dementia. Available at many CCRCs, memory support is designed for a better quality of life, not just for residents but for those who love them as well.

Have questions about your options? Contact us at Morningside of Fullerton. We can help you sort through the information to feel confident about the future.

More than just maintenance-free living.

If long-term care is not a future concern, an active adult community may seem like the right choice for a loved one to remain living independently. However, the need for health care often arises sooner than we think — and once health needs change, your loved one may no longer qualify for an active adult community. Choosing an option that provides residential living now and a plan for care in the future, if ever needed, is a good idea. That option is a CCRC (continuing care retirement community).

Why move to Morningside if my loved one is living independently?
Morningside not only suits your loved ones now — enriching their lifestyle with convenient on-site services and amenities — but it also offers access to health services they may need in the future. Experts say 70 percent of Americans who reach the age of 65 will need long-term care at some point.* Wellness in general takes on a whole new meaning at Morningside. There are daily programs and professionals to stimulate the mind, the body and the spirit. Our Safety Team is available 24/7 to assist with any resident needs, from the mundane to the serious. This provides true peace of mind for families as well as residents.

What does a CCRC offer?
Communities vary in many ways, but most CCRCs offer a range of living options, which may include residential living, assisted living and long term care in a skilled nursing facility, available through a one-time entrance fee that may or may not be repayable. Additional care services may also be available, such as memory support.

How can I tell if residential living is right for my loved one?
If they've been living on their own, they're healthy and managing any minor medical concerns, residential living is probably the right choice. If you have any doubts, there are signs to look for that can help you assess the situation before seeking help to determine the level of care needed.

What does it cost to live at a CCRC?
Costs can vary from one CCRC to another, and among various contract options at a single CCRC. A one-time entrance fee is typically required (normally through the sale of a home) for those joining the community at an residential living level. At Morningside, that fee is highly repayable, offering estate protection. An ongoing, predictable monthly fee covers the cost of residence, grounds, all maintenance and repairs, taxes, most utilities, a dining program and more. Morningside is more affordable than you might think, especially when you consider the fact that no other retirement option throughout Orange County offers all we do, as a Continuing Life® community.

What if long-term care is needed?
One of the biggest advantages of living at Morningside is that loved ones are close by, even if needs change. Access to care is afforded to residential living residents, so couples can stay together. This provides peace of mind for the whole family. That's because we have access to a full continuum of long-term care. In the event of an accident or immediate need, Morningside's skilled emergency response team assists and transports a resident to the nearest treatment center. All residences and community spaces are equipped with emergency-alert systems.

How do I start the conversation with my loved one about moving?
If you don't already know, you could ask about their plans for the future, how they want to enjoy their retirement years. If maintaining their home is consuming time they'd rather spend on other pursuits, that may open the door to discussing the benefits of moving.

We welcome your questions at Morningside, whether your loved ones eventually move here or not. Contact us to learn more.

*U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Clearinghouse for Long-Term Care Information website (www.longtermcare.gov)

Help your loved one maintain residential living.

Live better at Morningside, where your lifestyle is based on freedom and convenience, rather than the constraints of home ownership. Additional resources are listed below for more information.

Is life really better at Morningside? Learn the truth from our Resident Stories.

When a loved one needs help, we're here for both of you.

When it comes to senior care, knowing you're not alone is the first step toward making the right decision for your family. At Morningside, we not only provide residents with access to health services at an adjacent health center, but also help families find the right option — even if it's not us. If you're noticing changes in your loved one's behavior that seem to indicate a decline in their health, if you're helping them more often, taking on more responsibility, and spending more time worrying, it's time to start a conversation about your concerns.

Talk to your loved one
By acting now and sharing your concerns about a loved one's well-being, you're avoiding an emergency decision made later, under the most stressful of circumstances. It's easier when you have all the facts - simply contact us for more information.

Get family involved
Share your concerns with family members who can help by calling a family meeting to discuss the situation, divide responsibilities and agree on the best course of action. Ideally, everyone has a role so no one is overwhelmed.

Ask the experts
There are many experts available to help, from your loved one's physicians, to geriatric care managers and dozens of other resources. Start at Morningside, where we'll help you find just what you need for a happier, healthier future. Call us toll-free at 1-800-803-75971-800-803-7597 to schedule a visit at the health center.

Health care resources for the help you need.

When is it time to consider long-term care? Start by answering these questions:

  • Is your loved one thriving on their own, or just getting by?
  • Are you seeing changes that raise concerns?
  • What are your options, if needs change?

Determining the right choice when considering care for a loved one can be overwhelming. We'll answer your questions at Morningside — including where to turn for more information. Below you'll find a helpful list of resources we've compiled to get you started. Come in and talk with us to learn more about retirement living in Orange County.

Morningside
As a Continuing Life® community, we help seniors and their families find the best living and care options, whether here, at other locations, or at home. Call 1-800-803-75971-800-803-7597 for more details.

AARP
The nation's leading organization for people age 50 and older.

Administration on Aging
Site provides an overview on a variety of topics, programs and services related to aging.

AgeNet
Operates a comprehensive, national eldercare network to meet the needs of the aging population and their adult caregiving children.

Alzheimer's Association
The world leader in Alzheimer's research and support. The first and largest voluntary health organization dedicated to finding prevention methods, treatments and an eventual cure for Alzheimer's.

American Health Assistance Foundation
A charitable organization dedicated to funding research on age-related and degenerative diseases, educating the public about these diseases, and providing emergency financial assistance to persons with Alzheimer's and their caregivers.

American Heart Association
Offers information on heart attacks, strokes and family health.

Arthritis Foundation
Provides information on arthritis: types, treatments, coping tips and research information.

Care Managers
Referral sites to locate geriatric care managers who assess needs, identify and coordinate care resources.
www.caring.com
www.caremanager.org

Care Pathways
Site created and maintained by RNs to provide older adults and their families access to quality health care information, products and services.

National Institute on Aging
The National Institute on Aging leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging to extend the healthy, active years of life.

FDA Information for Older People
Articles, brochures and other publications with information on a wide range of health issues.

Health and Age
The Novartis Foundation for Gerontology supports education and innovation in healthy aging, geriatrics and the care of elderly people.

Medicare
Official U.S. government Medicare site.

Medicare Rights Center
The largest independent source of health care information and assistance in the United States for people with Medicare.

National Clearinghouse for Long-Term Care
Site developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide information and resources to help you and your family plan for future long-term care (LTC) needs.

Senior Health
Senior-friendly website featuring health information from the National Institute of Health.

WebMD
WebMD is the leading provider of online information, research, educational services, and communities for physicians and consumers.

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